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Encyclopedia Britannica to Shut Down Print Operations

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Feynmann, John von Neumann, and Mental Models

Support Michael Sporn’s Film about Edgar Allen Poe

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Nazi Rules for Regulating Funk ‘n Freedom

The Early History of Modern Computing: A Brief Chronology

Computing Encounters Being, an Addendum

On the Origin of Objects (towards a philosophy of computation)

Symposium on Graeber’s Debt

The Nightmare of Digital Film Preservation

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Nick J. on The Valve - Closed For Renovation

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Norma on Encyclopedia Britannica to Shut Down Print Operations

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Tuesday, July 27, 2010

Dianetics For Higher Ed?

Posted by Marc Bousquet on 07/27/10 at 10:53 AM

Should The New York Times (NYT) exist? Ha--you’re thinking, “What an unfair question!” Or “You’ve framed the debate in an obviously unfair or careless way."

And right you are. But since I’m a rich and powerful chunk of media capital with a stake in the answer, I don’t care what you think, and I’m free to compound the injury by holding a false “debate” on a question that unfairly asks one side to argue for its existence.

Enter The New York Times and its latest bungled attempt at analyzing higher ed, which just riffs on a piece reported by Robin Wilson for the Chronicle. As if framing a loaded question weren’t enough, they stack the deck, a couple of different ways. In the more obvious manipulation of the lineup, opponents of tenure outnumber proponents 3-2.

More importantly: in a debate about the “demise” of tenure,” the debate’s framers don’t include any voices of persons who are living the circumstances they purport to examine: the life of career faculty, full time or part time, with a teaching-intensive load and a nontenurable contract. One participant is on a nontenurable research contract--for a Harvard outfit that does management consulting for higher-ed administration, natch. But that’s like dressing up the testimony of someone who’s always driven a Rolls as the honest voice of straphangers--the near-volunteer faculty on freaking food stamps, like Monica, Andy, and many others.

As it turns out, 95% of the sense made in this debate is contained in the 40% assigned to the pro-tenure folks. AAUP president Cary Nelson patiently explains the centrality of tenure for academic freedom, and USC’s Adrianna Kezar, points to the real debate we should be having--about the high cost of nontenurable hiring in higher education, especially for the majority of faculty whose appointments are teaching-intensive, and the students they try to serve in the unsavory conditions management has created.

In the Opinion of L. Ron Hubbard...

Excepting a couple of minor points by the nontenurable researcher/management consultant, the anti-tenure side had little to offer beyond witless praise for The Market. Remember the the Planet of the Apes sequel where the surviving mutant humans live in a cave and worship the Holy Bomb that destroyed them?

It’s like that, including the gallows flavor to the campy humor, once you rip off the masks of the robed ritualistas:

Batting first for the NYT education-capitalist home team is Richard Vedder, perennial flack for the neo-cons at the American Enterprise Institute. His line here, that tenure “reduces intellectual diversity,” is just warmed-over David Horowitz, long debunked by any serious study.  The fact is that more academics fear for their academic freedom today than in the McCarthy era--because they lack access to tenure, not the other way around.

Playing new kid in the lineup is Mark C. Taylor, a distance education entrepreneur with books and interests ranging from religion and organization theory to management and--I am not making this up--stealing dirt from the graves of famous persons.

Taylor’s data-free ruminations bear as much connection to the actual world of higher education as Scientology does to particle physics. He’s the fellow that bemoaned per-course salaries “as low as” five grand (!) and basically acts as if you could still arm-chair analyze the academic labor system, which is nearly 80% contingent, as if it were a “market” in tenure-track jobs.

Taylor’s retread analysis is straight outta 1972: “If you were a CEO,” he begins, and races downhill from there. Dunno, Mark: If I was the CEO of my neighborhood… If I was the CEO of my marriage… If I was the CEO of this poker game… If I was the CEO of your church… If I was the CEO of the planet… If my dad were my CEO… If I were the CEO of this one-night stand… If I was the CEO of this classroom… If I was the CEO of this audience at this Green Day concert...

Gosh, Mark. Seems like some social organizations and relationships shouldn’t have CEOs at all.

Wait, there’s more. Taylor goes on to, like, use math and stuff because it sounds good when you’re talking about money. He figures out the lifetime cost of paying tenured faculty and boggles, claiming that funding this commitment “would require” four million in endowment now and thirty million thirty years from now. Et voila! Clearly, then, paying faculty anything at all is impossible! QE freaking D, lads and ladies.

Of course the fact that most faculty aren’t paid out of endowments at all but, like, from tuition and appropriations and grants and stuff, does create some stumbles among the seraphim in Taylor’s elegant pin-top choreography.

I did say that the anti-tenure side contributed 5% of the sense out of the 60% of the space allotted to them.

That modicum goes to Cathy Trower of Harvard’s COACHE, like the handbag, with an elegant E for education.

Her project is like a higher-ed stepchild version, less mean and less well-funded, of Harvard’s toxic b-school/ed-school partnership--you know, the folks that brought you Arne Duncan.

Unlike her comrades, Trower actually thinks about tenure and correctly advocates for a less rigid understanding of it. Somewhat overdramatically, she proposes blowing up the tenure system and starting over with a new constitutional convention: 

Some features of a newly imagined faculty workplace might include variable probationary periods, with extensions for parenthood, rather than a fixed seven-year up-or-out provision for tenure; a tenure track for faculty members focused on teaching; a non-tenure track that affords a meaningful role in shared governance; interdisciplinary centers with authority to be the locus of tenure; broader definitions of scholarship and acceptable outlets and media to “publish” research....

Most of these notions, of course, are very sensible, and versions of them are in place all over the country. No need to lug jerrycans of petrol to the bonfire.  It’s not until we get to Trower’s stealthy last two suggestions ("tenure for a defined period of time; and the option to earn salary premiums while forgoing tenure entirely") that we see that the NYT was perfectly fair to run her piece under the headlines “How to Start Over” and “Get Rid of (Tenure).” Trower conveniently left these out of the version she published two years ago in AAUP’s Academe.

Most Tenured Faculty ARE on a Teaching Track

If Trower were better informed about what’s actually going on, she’d be aware that all of her reasonable suggestions have distinguished histories as well as plenty of contemporary reality. Rendered most invisible by Trower’s crowing from the business-administration battlements is the suggestion that we need to invent a “tenure track for faculty members focused on teaching."

Huh?

In 1970, the overwhelming majority of tenured faculty were on teaching-intensive appointments. Even today, after four decades of hiring teaching-intensive appointments nontenurably (full-time and part-time), tenured teaching-intensive faculty out-number tenured research-intensive faculty as much as two to one.

The idea that “tenured” equates to teaching 6 hours a week or fewer is just silly propaganda. And I for one am sick of liberal bastions like Harvard and the NYT passing off propaganda as scholarship.

Including propaganda that has numbers in it: for crying out loud, my math-avoidant friends, the whole meaning of the expression that “there are lies, damned lies, and statistics“ is that any paid mouthpiece, windbag or liar can claim to be “data-driven."

I mean, Cathy, let’s be real here.

MANAGEMENT has spent the last four decades actively dismantling a long-existing “tenure track for faculty members focussed on teaching.” Now you lean out from the windows of your Lear jet to shout that we need to hold a constitutional convention to invent it?

You folks at Harvard oughta know that “data-driven” should mean something more than running a bunch of surveys. It should mean some reasonable attempt at a connection with the facts.

Regular readers know I’ve been pointing out the epic badness of the New York Times’ reporting on higher education for some time now. For what it’s worth, I have it on good authority that more than one academic journal is interested in taking a closer look at media bias in higher education coverage.

Of course this is a little like saying I know several clever Davids prepared to flip the bird at slow-witted Goliath. On the other hand, one of them might prove to own a slingshot.

xposted: howtheuniversityworks.com


Should the New York Times exist? Ha--you’re

thinking, “What an unfair question!” Or “You’ve

framed the debate in an obviously unfair or careless way."

And right you are. But since I’m a rich and

powerful chunk of media capital with a stake in

the answer, I don’t care what you think, and

I’m free to compound the unfairness by holding

a false “debate” on a carelessly-phrased question.  (Any first-year student in one of my classes learns that “are you for or against” any proposition is always a trick question--you’ve allowed someone else to put you in an intellectual box at the outset.)

This is exactly what the New York Times has done, in its latest bungled attempt at analyzing higher ed. As if framing a loaded question wasn’t enough, they stacked the deck on the against side, 3-2. Against two actual scholars theypolitical hacks, business

administrators and fringe bloviators to say the

paper shouldn’t exist. For window dressing,  

I’ll hire two scholars that honestly represent

the situation.

Of course I’ve been pointing out the epic

badness of the New York Times’ reporting on

higher education for some time now. But with

this waxworks, I wasn’t the only one--the

blogosphere spotted faux in this debate from

the first nanosecond.

Furthermore I have it on good authority that

more than one academic journal is interested in

taking a closer look at media bias in higher

education coverage. Of course this is a little

like saying I know several clever Davids

prepared to flip the bird at slow-witted

Goliath. On the other hand, one of them might

prove to own a slingshot.

Dianetics for Higher Ed?
Most prominent is their pimping for the

eccentric Mark C. Taylor, a distance education

entrepreneur and self-proclaimed universal

savant. Taylor’s data-free ruminations on what

the academy  bear as much connection to the

actual world of higher education as Scientology

does to particle physics.

Vedder? Three letters for you: AEI. He’s just a

stand-in for David Horowitz in this celebrity

death match. His claim, that tenure “reduces

intellectual diversity,” is unsubstantiated

crap. The fact is that more academics fear for

their academic freedom today than in the

McCarthy era--because they lack access to

tenure.

Trower? She directs COACHE, like the handbag,

with an elegant E for education. Her project is

like a step-child, less mean and less well-

funded higher ed version of Harvard’s toxic b-

school/ed-school partnership--you know, the

folks that brought you Arne Duncan. Unlike

Vedder and Taylor, she actually thinks about

tenure, and correctly advocates for a less

rigid understanding of it


Comments

Vedder’s work struck me as routine right-wing fluff; Trower’s as including a couple of proposals that disenfranchised NTT’s could benefit from.  But Taylor just scares me.  I mean, I knew from his incoherent attempt to explain the importance of Derrida in the NYT a few years ago that he couldn’t write; but this nonsense about salaries coming from endowments is either spectacular incompetence or dishonesty.  And not even original dishonesty:  it seems to be based on the Social Security Crisis arguments we’ve been seeing for twenty years.

By on 07/27/10 at 08:58 PM | Permanent link to this comment

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